Park City’s renowned Food & Wine Classic returns for its 13th year. Th e swanky, yet casual festival runs July 6 – July 9, featuring international and domestic wineries, distilleries, breweries, local restaurants and seminars.

With more than 20 events to choose from, the classic is designed for individualization. Each festivity must be purchased à la carte, lending patrons freedom to tailor their weekend to their needs. Wine on the Mountain, Stroll of Park City and Toast of Park City are the signature events highlighting the classic.


The kick-off event for the festival, Wine on The Mountain, is the smallest of the three signature events. Patrons can meet one-on-one with wine makers, distillers and brewers; the mountain background and live music are included. Th e majority of vendors consist of wineries, but patrons can cleanse their pallet with beer, spirits, and Executive Chef Shawn Armstrong’s heavy hors d’oeuvre creations.

Stroll of Park City is the largest event of the three. Located on Main Street, the stroll includes small bites and adult beverages from local Park City restaurants, with diff erent stations indoors and out. Th e stroll is intended to feature and support local businesses in Park City.


At the grand tasting event, there’s even more wine, international and domestic, showcasing the largest selection of wine at the classic. Th e Toast of Park City is outdoors, so people can enjoy summer weather while taking in views of the Uinta foothills (transportation is provided with each ticket). Also included are bites from Executive Chef Justin Rogers along with beer, spirits and live music.

Amanda Power, producer at Townsquare Media and director of the Food & Wine Classic, says the festival expects to restore favorite seminars from past years, such as bike riding with a chef and horseback riding. However, patrons should also anticipate new events. Power hints of a craft -cocktail-making class.

“You get to meet people who have a lot of experience with the brands such as local chefs, wineries and distillers,” Power remarks, “People come back year aft er year. I want to create an event that really speaks to the community.” Th e annual classic also benefi ts the community. A portion of each ticket, along with an auction at Wine on Th e Mountain, is donated to the People’s Health Clinic in Park City.

By Laura Wester